Slow Fitness Exercise Routines

Slow Fitness Exercise Routines

Slow fitness is the perfect term for the exercise routines I promote here on Internal Force Fitness. Coupled with ticking all of the boxes for a ‘movement diet‘ I’m delighted that more people are looking to slow things down, but actually do MORE.

What is Slow Fitness?

As far as I’M concerned slow fitness is moving around just hard enough to get the blood flowing, lubricate the joints, and put them through their full range of motion. In fact, just read the blurb from the FIRST book I wrote for Internal Force Fitness:

These exercises have been the subject of rigorous testing to produce a moderate-intensity exercise routine that has a positive effect on motor skills (in that they require the integration of muscular, skeletal and neurological functions). Each exercise also works a particular range of motion, and thus overall the routine provides good, gentle exercise to all body parts. The large muscle groups are all utilized, lubricating all of the joints in the body, and improving circulatory and respiratory fitness. The aim of this broadcast gymnastics exercise routine is to improve the operating system of the human body (and aren’t you due an upgrade?).

Sounds pretty good, right? That is from Chinese Radio Exercises – and is STILL one of my favourite routines.

Slow fitness routines can be done in as little as 5 minutes (all of the Radio Taiso and the various calisthenics routines I promote on this site take 4-5 minutes if only run through once), or up to 10-15 minutes – but there really is no rush!

Little and Often is OK!

I have always been an exponent of little and often (even before I heard the term slow fitness) as regards exercise, because to me it has always made sense. Regardless of what fitness magazines may tell you, if you want to build a muscular body then a good diet and a 3-day-week schedule of weightlifting will do it. Those sessions need only be 1-2 hours long so in a hypothetical sense it’s really quite easy… But just take a second to realise how many hours you’re NOT doing anything! Maybe you team the weightlifting with some jogging or cardio or something, which is fair enough, but you’re still not really living a healthy LIFESTYLE.

The way we live today puts CONSTANT pressure on our nervous systems; daily alarms and alerts, sedentary jobs etc. Therefore does it not make sense to CONSTANTLY try and be on the move, release the pressures before they become pressures, stop yourself becoming bogged down in BLAH!?

Slow Fitness and Physical Culture

Physical culture is a term that pops up a lot in the reproductions I offer here at Internal Force Fitness, and it is a wonderful term that means: movements designed to increase strength, fitness and flexibility. It was a massive movement back in the 20s and continued through to the 60s, and in my own small way, I am trying to bring it back. I want people to get up in the morning and move, then go to work and move, then get home and move, then go to bed, sleep well and start the whole thing again. No big sweaty workouts, no expensive equipment, no need to even leave the house. It’s a different kind of fitness. It’s a slow fitness. It’s an Internal Force Fitness.

On Trend

Oh yea, and apparently I’m right on point for 2020! https://www.esquire.com/uk/life/fitness-wellbeing/a30982608/slow-fitness-health-trend-2020/

Richie Neville | Director | Internal Force Fitness

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  1. Love what you’re doing here Richie. Having recently discovered the term Physical Culture, I was delighted to see it mentioned in this post. I’d not heard the term Slow Fitness before. It is perfect for what me and others are trying to envision and build for the local Parkinson’s community.

    Your stunning efforts with Internal Force Fitness over the past several years, as evidenced in this website, is inspirational. Said another way: I like your style and approach. Keep up the good work, sir.

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